Bruce Hornsby And The Range - The Way It Is
RCA  (1986)
80s, Pop, Pop Rock

In Collection
#7

0*
CD Album    9 tracks  (43:12) 
   01   On The Western Skyline             04:44
   02   Every Little Kiss             05:49
   03   Mandolin Rain             05:19
   04   The Long Race             04:24
   05   The Way It Is             04:57
   06   Down The Road Tonight             04:27
   07   The Wild Frontier             04:04
   08   The River Runs Low             04:28
   09   The Red Plains             05:00
Personal Details
Location Downstairs Bookcase shelf 1
Details
Cat. Number PD89901
UPC (Barcode) 035628990129
Packaging Jewel Case
Spars DDD
Sound Stereo
Notes
OK, so this isn't technically the second day, I didn't post anything yesterday or the day before, but meh. Sit down, as this one's a long one.

Once again, this is an album I've talked about quite a few times (I've probably mentioned the title track many, many times), but I've never gon through exactly why I like this album, and considering we're in lockdown still, I might as well go through every single little detail of why I liked the title song so much... Strap in, this is going to be a long one (that's what she said!)

Way back in 1986, Bruce Hornsby released his debut album, and the lead single was its title track, The Way It is. I can pinpoint the first time I ever heard the song. It was a Sunday morning and I was 6, we were going along Davison Drive, past Holy Trinity church. I remember hearing the piano section in the chorus, and not liking it. That was that, or so I thought. As the months went by, it became to be used a lot on TV, especially the instrumetal sections. Out of a song that's 4 minutes and 58 seconds in length, a good three minutes of it is fully instrumental. Its most prominent use was showing the football league tables on Grandstand, where the instrumental section at the end of the song was looped. By this time, I was about 7 or 8, and began to like the song. In fact, I loved it. Obviously, the never mentioned its name.

At that age, I couldn't ask anyone what it was called. Nobody knew what I was on about. It began to become an obsession. I still have vivid recollections of Saturday afternoons, the smell of roast pork wafting through the house, the big light blaring in the living room because it was winter and getting dark at 4:45.

I heard it ONCE on the radio around that time. Going down Warren Road. For some reason, I thought it was called "Run For The Hills" or something like that. Obviously, that'd be a dead end. then, back in Xmas 1989, I caught part of the song on tape. At this point, I didn't know if it was the right song or now. It was a piano instrumental, but part of the middle bit. In fact, the sectrion from 2:40 - 2:49 if you're playing along at home. I played this tape to within an inch of its life, still not knowing if that was the song or not. Sometime after this, I got to learn the titile, sadly I can't remember how. I think some kid sang it and played the piano on "Going Live". No footage of this exists on Youtube that I can see.

April 1991. BBC's coverage of the Grand National used a full portion of the song! I always tape the Grand National, so the video was ready. I rushed over, pressed record, aaaand I'd accidentally recorded Tyne Tees instead of BBC1. I could have cried. In fact, I probably did. What should have been the runners and riders played to this tune resulted in 2 minutes of The Chart Show. Aaargh. Was I ever going to get a decent recording of the song?

Some time later in 1991, I caught, purely by chance, the first 15 seconds. It was being used by TFM to advertise their "200 best songs", where listeners would vote for their best songs. I still didn't know if this clip was "The Way It Is" or not, after never hearing the intro. It did sound really similar through. For some reason, this was printed in the local paper. There it was! I finally had the name and the artist! Which... I promptly forgot. I guess when I was 11, I thought my short term memory was better than it is, and within minutes I'd forgotten. Bugger. No idea why I didn't think of keeping that piece of paper, or at least write it down somewhere.

So, I was back to square 1. A couple of years passed, and we're in 1993. I wqas spending a sunny Saturday out in the car with my dad. He used to mend and deliver tellies, so I would often join him in his jaunts around the north east. I would listen to the radio while he would go in, and do what he needed to do with the telly. The radio was tuned to Atlantic 252. All of a sudden, the intro came on. Oh my god. Would this be it? The song played, and I must have lost about half a stone, dancing around in the van. Both sections I had on tape were from the song! I was over the moon. Unfortunately, they had a habit of playing a bunch of songs then never saying the title and artist, exactly what they did in this situation. At least I knew of a radio station that had a copy.

I would then listen to Atlantic 252 at every given opportunity. One day, my dad was off work so he picked me up from school at lunchtime. On goes Atlantic 252, and on comes the song! It was a short drive, so we get home, I burst through the door, run upstairs and manage to get the last minute or so on tape! YES! Again, no artist or title. Damn you, afore-mentioned radio station! This time, I had enough audio to play people to see if they knew it. As I mentioned, this was 1993. It was after my mam had died, and my nanna was still living with us. We had a home help called Trina, who I played the song to... "Yeah, it's Bruce Hornsby & The Range". FINALLY! After years of searching, I finally had the artists' name. I'd heard it a couple of times on the radio after that, again on this same station. I managed to tape a slightly longer portion of the song, albeit with a deafening high-pitched tome over the top of it. Atlantic 252 was broadcast from Ireland (hence its name) on long wave, so you'd often get plenty of interference on there. Now, to track down a copy.

Summer 1993 came. We'd planned a family trip to the lakes. A friend called Steven was going to come too, but the night before he spewed up a load of jumbo sausage and chips, so unfortunately couldn't make it. The day went ahead anwyay, and was a pretty standard day out. Me and my dad ended up in a shop that sold tapes. There it was, the holy grail. An actual real, no foolin' copy of the tape. Unfortuanely, this was at the end of the day. My money had dried up. I asked my dad if he could buy it for me, and I'd pay him back with what little pocket money I'd earn over the following couple of weeks. He refused. He wouldn't even put it on his card, saying he didn't have enough money on it. I was devastated, and I left, having to put the tape back from whence it came. It literally felt like I'd been punched in the stomach. Something I'd wanted for most of my childhood was right in my hands, and it was being denied.

I'll never know if Daddykins had enough money on his card or not. He probably won't remember anything of the day, but this hurt me pretty bad.

Fast forward a few months. December 9th 1993. This was not long after my birthday, and I finally had some money to call my own. I remember going to the shooping centre. This was my first visit to the shopping centre after the glass roof had been installed, and how bright and shiny it all looked. I went to Woolworths, and browsed the tapes section. There it was! And I finally had my own money to pay for it. BANG! DONE! My long search was over. A stereo, uninterfered copy of my favourite song. Ibviously, there were other songs on the album, which I'll get to shortly.

That's pretty much it. On Decmber 27th 1994, I tracked down a copy of the track on CD, thanks to Dino Entertainment's "Rock Anthems". Track 5, disc 2. I always remember the advert played a section of a house burning over the song. I later learned that this was never in the video, so no idea where they dragged that up from.

Obviously, I've picked up a CD copy of the album since then. In more recent times, it came back to prominence, thanks to 2Pac's song "Changes", which makes heavy use of Hornsby's composition. Thanks to this resurgence, the song is no longer hard to track down, and is in every "classic hits" radio station's playlist. For that reason, it doesn't quite have the same impact to me that it once had, but I hope you found this interesting. Almost 1500 words in, and I haven't even got the the actual album yet.

Here goes...

01. ON THE WESTERN SKYLINE
Interestingly, on all of the UK / European CD copies of this I've seen, has this titled as "On The Western Sklyline". Even the re-released version with the 74321 catalogue number has this typo. The US pressings with the yellow back have the right spelling, so do all of the LP versions.

Anyway, it starts off with a country vibe. More fiddles than a [insert libellous joke here]. I like this one a lot more than I used to. Mentioned a streetlight. Gets a bonus point for that. Overall, a nice little song, even if it doesn't seem to do anywhere.

02. EVERY LITTLE KISS
One of the songs off the album to be released as a single. This is the longest song on the album. It starts off with a piano intro very similar to "the Way It Is" According to Wikipedia, The introductory passage of the song quotes Charles Ives's work "The Alcotts" (another wikipedia page says "Piano Sonata No 2" so fight amongst yourselves about which one is correct.

This was also the first song to be released as a single in the US, though it didn't fare too well. It was released as a single over here too. The B side contains a different version of "The River Runs Low"... more on that later. The other track is an intrumental remix of "the Way It Is". This also has piano instrumental sections, which are cut down for the 7" single release. the 12" has this full version on it. An instrumental version cann be found on the CD single of the next track, so with slightly different percussion, and about 20 seconds longer.

03. MANDOLIN RAIN
Arguably, Bruce's second biggest hit, though it only reached 70 in the charts over here. Don't mind it, but it does sort-of plod on a bit. The single version apparently checks in at just under 4 minutes long, and this one is just under 6.

04. THE LONG RACE
Another good, poppy little song. Guitar, accordion, drums... but no piano? The only song so far that doesn't have a piano solo on it. Maybe on the entire album? Strange that all of the times I've listened to the album I've never noticed that before. And that's side 1 complete, if you're listening to the tape or album.

05. THE WAY IT IS
See above. I'm not going through all that again.

06. DOWN THE ROAD TONIGHT
Possibly my favourite song about going to see a prostitute ever (Sorry if you've turned of from a Google search for the phrase, you're in for a disappointment). It's "OK", I guess, but a bit slow and doesn't really go anywhere. If you play this song at 45PRM instead of 33RPM, it genuinely sounds much better. The exatra speed improves it immensely, and stops it feeling too "ploddy". Features Huey Lewis on Harmonica and backing vocals

07. THE WILD FRONTIER
More of a country feel to this one, and a bassline that seems to get in the way quite a bit. I'm find it hard to find a track to skip with this album, but I'd probably have to go for this one, as it doesn't really fit with the rest of the album. No piano in this one either. It sounds strangely disjointed.

08. THE RIVER RUNS LOW
The slowest track on the album, entirely piano, synth and vocal. It was never always like that, as the first pressing of the album has a different version on it, that has more of a beat to it. This alternate version is the one that's featured on the B side to "every Little Kiss". I can see why they re-recorded it though. Each album needs a slow ballady type track, and the original version doesn't really do this.

09. THE RED PLAINS
Possibly my favourite song about someone's house burning down. Or a wildfire. Not quite sure. If you flipped the "The Way It Is" single over, this is what you got. My second favourite track on the album by far. Probably the catchiest song and album Finished with a 90-second guitar and piano instrmental. A great way to close off the album.

Well, there we have it. This lockdown's allowed me to dump more memories onto my blog. I'm pretty much burned out after three hours of typing, so I'm going to play some more pinball, and think of what to post tomorrow(ish). I've not really scanned it for typos either, so feel free to bombard the collents if you spot any. Ah, who am I kidding? Nobody's read this far!